Massada Mountain Fortress

Massada

The impressive fortress of Massada was the last Jewish stronghold to fall to the Romans in 73 AD, a place that symbolizes the exile of the Jews from the Holy Land. The events that occurred here denote bravery and self-sacrifice of the Jewish people. The site welcomes many thousands of people on a Massada tour every year and is accessible either via 2 ramp trails or by cable car (found on one side only).

Masada Mountain fortress


Massada’s history

Set atop a breathtaking rock plateau overlooking the Judean desert, Massada was constructed by King Herod the Great in around 37 to 31 BC. A sect of Jews took refuge here during the war with the Romans in the first century AD, a sect termed ‘zealots’ in Greek. They were eventually defeated by the Roman army, however they refused to be enslaved and it is said they decided instead to commit a mass suicide.


Masada Mountain fortress

What to see

Massada was given World Heritage Site status for its spectacular ruins, including Herod’s palace complex with its Roman mosaics and bath houses, the sect's synagogues, houses and storehouses. The wall paintings in the palace have been restored and provide a fascinating insight into daily life under Herod’s rule. Nearby museums are home to a vast array of historical artifacts showcased in dramatic settings while audio guides can be rented to provide a valuable insight into the exhibits. The siege wall is around 2 kilometers long and over 2 meters wide, and the siege ramp and ancient weapons left behind by Roman camps make Masada one of the most well persevered ancient siege sites in the world.

From the top of Massada visitors can see the remnants of the Roman encampments and take in the beauty of the Judean desert and nearby Dead Sea.

Masada Mountain Fortress

Masada in Israel

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

Massada Tour

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